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Bkgd Refs on Behavior Analysis and Public Policy - Certification and Licensure

Page history last edited by Regina Claypool-Frey 10 years, 5 months ago

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DISCLAIMER: The information on this site is presented on an "as is" basis, and does not claim to present definitive information, make recommendation or to represent any official policy or opinion of any official body or organization, such as the Association for Behavior Analysis International. Users of this site are urged to consult relevant organizations directly, to verify stated information, and agree that the owner of the site or authors of pages and articles are indemnified against legal liability


  

Articles[1]

 

Cautilli, J., & Dziewolska, H. (2007). Editorial on behavior analytic licensure: General historical issues of why people oppose licensing and the common replies. International Journal of Behavioral Consultation and Therapy, 4(1), 1-13.

Accessed 2/16/2009.

Keywords: Defining behavior analysis, origins of behavior analysis, licensing of behavior analysis, impact of

licensing, history, & common criticisms

ERIC database summary: A recent survey by the new PIBA SIG suggests strong support for licensure among behavior analysts. This editorial will explore some of the common arguments against licensure and present some factual information to support or counter those arguments. The four common arguments are (1) licensure will hurt the science of behavior analysis (2) licensure protects the profession but fails to protect the public, (3) master level people do not receive sufficient training to function independently and (4) regulatory concerns. Finally, we will look at the history of licensing and counter history of calls to exclude professions from licensing. (Contains 8 footnotes.)

 

Cautilli, J. & Weinberg, M. (2007). Editorial: To license or not to license? That is the question: Or, if we make a profession, will they come? The Behavior Analyst Today, 8(1), 1-8. Accessed 2/16/2009.

No listed keywords.

 

Cautilli, J.D., & Weinberg, M. (2007b). Editorial – Beholden to other professions.The Behavior Analyst Today, 8(2), 111-112.

Accessed 2/16/2009.

Keywords: Behavior analysis, professional recognition, recidivism, offenders

 

Cautilli, J.D., & Weinberg, M. (2008). Licensure as a postmodern hero. The Behavior Analyst Today, 9(1), 1-3.

Accessed 12/4/2009.

Keywords: Licensure, Behavior Analysts, Professional Practice, Post-Modern, Signal Detection Theory

 

Dorsey, M.F., Weinberg, M., Zane, T., & Guidi, M.M. (2009).

The case for licensure of applied behavior analysts. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 2

(1), 53-58. Accessed 6/6/09

Keywords unavailable through this link

 

A Primer on Professional Credentialing:Introduction to Invited Commentaries on Licensing Behavior Analysts

Gina Green, Ph.D., BCBA, Association of Professional Behavior Analysts. & James M. Johnston, Ph.D., BCBA, Auburn University

Accessed 6/6/09

http://www.apbahome.net/green1.pdf 

Descriptors: behavior analysis certification, licensing of behavior analysts, professional credentials

Published final version as

Green, G., & Johnston, J.M. (2009a).  A primer on professional credentialing: Introduction to invited commentaries on licensing behavior analysts. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 2(1), 51-52.

 

Licensing Behavior Analysts: Risks and Alternatives

Gina Green, Ph.D., BCBA, Association of Professional Behavior Analysts. & James M. Johnston, Ph.D., BCBA, Auburn University

Accessed 6/6/09

http://www.apbahome.net/green2.pdf 

Descriptors: behavior analysis licensure

Published final version as

Green, G., & Johnston, J.M. (2009b). Licensing behavior analysts: Risks and alternatives. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 2(1), 59-64.

 

Hassert, D., Kelly, A., Pritchard, J., & Cautilli, J. (2008). The licensing of behavior analysis: Protecting the profession and the publicJournal of Early and Intensive Behavioral Intervention. 5(2), 8-19. Accessed 2/16/2009.

No keywords listed. Topic is professional licensure.

ERIC database summary: Applied behavior analysis is a hybrid tradition with roots in many mental health disciplines. Even with these diverse origins, the professional practice of behavior analysis remains distinct and identifiable. Given these factors the professional practice special interest group (SIG) for the Association for Behavior Analysis International has proposed a model-licensing act. The behavior analyst model-licensing act (BAMLA) seeks to restrict the title of "licensed behavior analyst" but not the practice of behavior analysis. This argument has legal basis and precedent. Recently many papers have appeared supporting behavior analytic licensing; however, none to this point have addressed the issues of a licensing board's ability for rule creation and management and aid of impaired professionals, nor their ability to assist in fostering professional identity. This paper seeks to explore these views. (Contains 5 footnotes.)

 

Johnston, J.M. & Sherman, R.A. (1993). Applying the least restrictive alternative principle to treatment decisions: A legal and behavioral analysis. The Behavior Analyst, 16(1), 103-115. Accessed 12/4/09.

Keywords: least restrictive alternative, treatment decisions, legal issues, behavioral programming.

 

Johnston, J. M. & Shook, G. L. (1987). Developing behavior analysis at the state level. The Behavior Analyst, 10(2), 199-233.Accessed 12/4/09.

Key words: peer review, certification, state association, retardation, developmental disabilities, para-professional staff, regulatory manual.

 

Johnston, J. M. & Shook, G. L. (2001). A national certification program for behavior analysts. Behavioral Interventions, 16(2), 77-85. DOI: 10.1002/bin.81 Accessed 12/4/09.

No keywords supplied at this level.

 

Mattaini, M.A. (2008). Editorial: Licensing behavior analysts. Behavior and Social Issues, 17(2), 115-118. Accessed 3/25/09

No keywords supplied.

 

Shook, G. L. (1993). The professional credential in behavior analysis. The Behavior Analyst, 16(1), 87-101. Accessed 12/4/09.

Key words: credentialing, certification, accreditation, ethics, licensing, registration.

 

Shook, G. L., Ala’I-Rosales, S. & Glenn, S. (2002). Training and certifying behavior analysts. Behavior Modification, 26(1), 27-48. Accessed 12/4/09.

No key words available at this level.

 

Shook, G. L. (2005). An examination of the integrity and future of the behavior analyst certification board® credentials. Behavior Modification, 29(3), 562-574. DOI: 10.1177/0145445504274203. Accessed 12/4/09.

Key Words: certification • credentialing • behavior analysis • quality control

Summary at Worldcat.org: Proper professional certification and training of behavior analysts who work with individuals with autism is critical in ensuring that those individuals receive the highest quality behavior analytic services. This article discusses the current issues surrounding certification of behavior analysts and describes the important features of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board and its credentials. The article also reviews approaches to the training of professional behavior analyst practitioners and discusses appropriate training content for behavior analysts who work with persons with autism. The interrelationship between training and certification is explored.

 

Footnotes

  1. Articles are drawn from a cross reference of "behavior analysis" and "public policy" in Google Scholar, ERIC database, Worldcat.org Search engine of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, using search term "public policy". Behavior analysis in developmental disabilities, 3rd. Ed. 1968-1995 from the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Reprint Series volume 1.1997. Lawrence, KS: Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Methodological and conceptual issues in applied behavior analysis, 2nd. Ed. 1968-1999 from the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Reprint Series volume 4. 2000. Lawrence, KS: Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Behavior analysis: Applications and extensions 1968-1999 from the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Reprint Series volume 5. 2000. Lawrence, KS: Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Behavior analysis in education, 2nd. Ed. 1968-2002 from the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Reprint Series volume 3. 2004. Lawrence, KS: Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

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